Sage Grouse Viewing

March and April mark the mating period for Greater Sage Grouse. The males’ sunrise courting display is very unique and takes place on an open piece of ground called a lek. the males and females return to the lek every year for mating. The males strut and puff up their chests by inflating air sacs….

Fog, Frost, and Floods

You may have heard parts of Wyoming are experiencing flooding due to river ice breaking up. Some great aerial photos of the Worland flooding can be found at Yule Photography under Brandon’s freelance photos. It’s possible to plan for high flow flooding, but ice jams are pretty unpredictable. However, sharp bends in the river, bridges,…

An Unusual Sight- Even in Wyoming

I’m used to seeing any number of animals on early morning backroads, and it’s not unusual to see the occasional cow or horse on the road since many of the smaller backroads are not fenced off. It’s what’s known as open range. But this morning I had to take a second look and make sure…

FINALLY, Some Snow

Last year El Nino resulted in a very dry winter. The effects lingered through our summer and fall. Finally, a ski-able snow. I hadn’t been able to ski on the hay meadows for two years, until yesterday, that is. The short term forecast predicts temps in the fifties today, so good bye (again) snow!

Most Photographed Mountains?

I don’t know if it’s true, but the Tetons might just be the most photographed mountains in North America. A convenient turn out on the highway running south into Jackson Hole is the place where most folks stop to photograph the Tetons and this past weekend I was one of  thousands. A quick run through…

It’s a Tall Order

Tall order is putting it mildly. In a recent article in the Elko Daily Free Press the issues surrounding the management of wild horses and burros on western lands is succinctly addressed. The topic is “brimming with emotion on all sides” write the editors. I even fielded a call from my own mother (residing in…

Old Farmall Still Farming

My mother’s father was a farmer. My mother  couldn’t wait to get off the farm and experience the city lights. She says I got the farmer gene, which often skips a generation. This old tractor still runs, and we use it to cut hay. It’s a simple machine. When I drive it I feel the…

Medicine Wheel, Bighorn Mountains

I visited this well known landmark many years ago.  At that time the  chain link and barbed wire enclosure resulted in an unwelcoming experience.  Everything about the old enclosure seemed to yell “stay out!” I’m glad we took the time to revisit the site on a recent trip to the area. In 1996 the Bighorn…

Gotta Be Tough

Spring time in Wyoming is defined by rapid changes in weather. The sun may shine, or it might rain or snow, or rain AND snow, all in the same day. Wet spring snows usually melt quickly into the warming ground. They may be inconvenient, but it’s good to know the earth is getting watered after…

Spring Snow Sepia

As I drove out of the ranch this morning I couldn’t help but stop and take a few quick shots. Last night’s wet snow clung to every twig, leaf, wire, and hair. It was overcast and the morning light under these conditions is mesmerizing. The colors are muted and softened. There’s an almost-sepia affect on…

Curlleaf Mountain Mahogany: Witness of the Ages

And so it begins. A little snow melt running down a crack in the rock, a little pooling here and there, and when all the pieces of the puzzle fit together, a native shrub germinates in a sea of rock. It’s not hard to imagine why this green plant is attractive forage for big game…

No Roadrunners Here

We had a wet spring in 2015 which resulted in a bumper crop of rabbits and mice. The coyotes are now reaping the benefits. This coyote was pretty intent on running away from me until he caught a whiff of dinner. He couldn’t ignore it.